David Jones, artist and poet (1895-1974) begins his PREFACE TO THE ANATHEMATA :

'I have made a heap of all that I could find.' (1) So wrote Nennius, or whoever composed the introductory matter to Historia Brittonum. He speaks of an 'inward wound' which was caused by the fear that certain things dear to him 'should be like smoke dissipated'. Further, he says, 'not trusting my own learning, which is none at all, but partly from writings and monuments of the ancient inhabitants of Britain, partly from the annals of the Romans and the chronicles of the sacred fathers, Isidore, Hieronymous, Prosper, Eusebius and from the histories of the Scots and Saxons although our enemies . . . I have lispingly put together this . . . about past transactions, that [this material] might not be trodden under foot'. (2)

(1) The actual words are coacervavi omne quod inveni, and occur in Prologue 2 to the Historia.
(2) Quoted from the translation of Prologue 1. See The Works of Gildas and Nennius, J.A.Giles, London 1841.


09 April 2020

socio-isoLOGOS/HA HA


Chris Mann was the first person I heard talk of language as a virus. That was probably in the early 1980s. I don't know if it was Chris's own thought or if he had encountered it via William Burroughs :

What Burroughs terms the viral function of language is its ongoing ordering of reality toward the limit of total control, the opposite of anarchy. He employs the figure of the virus, a force hovering between evolving being and mere replicator, to problematize conventional definitions of living and non-living.9 In Burroughs' cosmos, one must always remember that the words one transmits can never be neutral moves in the universal language-game; even if misfiring, some sort of force is necessarily being transmitted. This is the very problem addressed by Csicsery-Ronay when he cites Jameson's skepticism over sf's linguistic aporia. It is exceptionally difficult for any resistant message to avoid complicity with the dominant communication systems in whose language it is composed. If “a butterfly flapping its wings in Tokyo can cause a tornado in Toledo” (Porush 381), who knows what havoc a few well-chosen words could wreak in the infosphere? As responsible cyborg-writers, we'd best have a good idea how the “techsts” we use are going to function out there before we turn them loose. The trick, argues Burroughs, is to transmit a kind of force that doesn't immediately contribute to the virus-effect but can actually help work against it. The fold-in is the principle textual method of guerilla resistance against the virus (or, as Burroughs puts it in his science-fictional work, against the Nova Conspiracy); one takes a strongly linear form like the typewritten word, cuts it, and reassembles it such that its ordinative powers are deactivated.10 As apomorphine was Burroughs' antidote to morphine addiction, so silence is the antidote to word-addiction and the fold-in to order-addiction.11 This resistance, in Burroughs' work, is the only option under the circumstances of total occupation by Control.

- from William S. Burroughs and the Language of Cyberpunk
by Brent Wood
Science Fiction Studies : #68, Volume 23, Part 1, March 1996

     
click image to enlarge  

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07 April 2020

gaze anaTARmy


Gray's Anatomy (1858)

- wikipedia  
gaze anaTARmy 

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04 April 2020

draw draw draw your oar gently o'er the see


MELBOURNE.- The National Gallery of Victoria has launched a new four-part virtual series of its popular Drop-by Drawing program.

This virtual iteration of the program invites audiences to watch a video tutorial of a Drop-by Drawing class, which features tips and tricks on how to draw from some of Victoria’s most engaging contemporary artists.

The series features Victorian artists Minna Gilligan, Lily Mae Martin and Kenny Pittock giving a step-by-step guide on how to draw, whilst taking inspiration from some of their favourite artworks in the NGV Collection.

Tony Ellwood AM, Director, NGV said: “Our Drop-by Drawing program is one of the NGV’s much-loved programs where our visitors can hone their drawing skills in the setting of the wonderful NGV Collection. We know drawing is a very mindful and therapeutic activity, and during this time we are delighted to be able to give audiences a chance to experience virtual Drop-by Drawing tutorials at home.”

click image to enlarge              
            
      free pencil movement protest NGV Drawing Ban (2004)

PART ONE - SUNDAY 5 APRIL
PRESENTED BY LILY MAE MARTIN ON NGV CHANNEL 
The first virtual drawing class hosted by Lily Mae Martin, takes viewers into the NGV’s 19th Century European Paintings Gallery where she takes inspiration from the life-size marble sculpture Musidora, 1878 by Marshall Wood. Musidora was a mythological ancient Greek goddess, who inspired all forms of literature and the arts and is the striking centrepiece of the gallery.

Martin encourages at-home participants to focus on simple drawing exercises, including observational drawing and mark making, to begin their sketch of Musidora. These practical skills demonstrate to viewers how working on a drawing in stages builds consistency in their work.

“It is about getting comfortable with drawing and embracing the practice of mastering the technique. The key to drawing is practice! Take time to look at the object and study it. Be comfortable in your setup and your space, whether you are drawing a sculpture or the kettle in your kitchen. It's something you can do at home with everyday objects,” she said.


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02 April 2020

a pedant's lament


So, 
look, 
blah blah 
very unique.

Absolutely!


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01 April 2020

Love in the Time of


"Well, I don't know what will happen now. We've got some difficult days ahead...

Some days after jotting down the drawing below, Dr King's final speech returns to the fore



"Well, I don't know what will happen now. We've got some difficult days ahead. But it really doesn't matter with me now, because I've been to the mountaintop. And I don't mind. Like anybody, I would like to live – a long life; longevity has its place. But I'm not concerned about that now. I just want to do God's will. And He's allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I've looked over. And I've seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the Promised Land. So I'm happy, tonight. I'm not worried about anything. I'm not fearing any man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.
  - Wikipedia


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29 March 2020

flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap


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27 March 2020

adverTARvirus

coronavirus inbox spam tsunami

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26 March 2020

HAND SPACE TransmiTAR



Bendigo TransmiTAR 
 Transmission Simulcast 
 [ Bendigo-Moscow-Melbourne ] 

 Right hand of Leon Trotsky
 'air-brushed' by Soviets
 reappears in Melbourne auction room 
 photograph

Leonard Joel Archive  
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25 March 2020

TARzen's Adventures of Regard


Tarzan swings, Tarzan falls
Tarzan hangs by the hair of his...
Don't be mistaken
Don't be misled,
Tarzan hangs by the hair of his head.

- as remembered, after drawing this :

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24 March 2020

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Theatre of the Actors of Regard  
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