David Jones, artist and poet (1895-1974) begins his PREFACE TO THE ANATHEMATA :

'I have made a heap of all that I could find.' (1) So wrote Nennius, or whoever composed the introductory matter to Historia Brittonum. He speaks of an 'inward wound' which was caused by the fear that certain things dear to him 'should be like smoke dissipated'. Further, he says, 'not trusting my own learning, which is none at all, but partly from writings and monuments of the ancient inhabitants of Britain, partly from the annals of the Romans and the chronicles of the sacred fathers, Isidore, Hieronymous, Prosper, Eusebius and from the histories of the Scots and Saxons although our enemies . . . I have lispingly put together this . . . about past transactions, that [this material] might not be trodden under foot'. (2)

(1) The actual words are coacervavi omne quod inveni, and occur in Prologue 2 to the Historia.
(2) Quoted from the translation of Prologue 1. See The Works of Gildas and Nennius, J.A.Giles, London 1841.


23 April 2015

The Charge of the Light Regard : a timeline

        
In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.
And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.
And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.
     
Theatre of the Actors of the Regard saw the light, and it was good.

1919 : The Irish poet W.B.Yeats composes The Second Coming.
It concludes with the lines :

    And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
    Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?
            
1920 : The word robot is relatively recent. From the Czech robotnik "slave" and robota "forced labor", it was first used by Karel Čapek in 1920, in his sci-fi play R.U.R. (Rosumovi Univerzální Roboti with the original English subtitle Rossum’s Universal Robots.)

1927 : The first robot appears on film in Fritz Lang's Metropolis.

1933 : The film King Kong in which a gorilla colossus is loosed upon the Modern City colossus.

1935 : Two years later, Melbourne stages the All-Electrical Exhibition. The promotional image shows a robot colossus standing over and over-scaling the great Royal Exhibition Building as it regards the equally great electrically luminous exhibition architecture.

     See : Power and Modernity : A Photo Essay on the Centenary
     All-Electricity Exhibition, 1935  by Robin Grow, 2008
     
Light Show :

2015 : This 2013 exhibition from London's Hayward Gallery is restaged at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (16 April - 5 July 2015)
         
See the ELECTRICAL MAN :
     


SEE THE ELECTRICAL WONDERS :
                 

Theatre of the Actors of Regard 
See your Self (sic) see the Electrical Man see the Electrical Wonders of this bLOGOS/HA HA Light Show :
        
detail
A Person Looks At A Work Of Art/
someone looks at something...

LOGOS/HA HA


       
           

20 April 2015

The Charge of the Light Regard ( To the G! )

       
"The first electric lights were lamps, dazzling bright electric discharges of several hundred candle power, struck, between carbon electrodes fed by batteries. The arc lamp was invented by Humphry Davy in 1807, but was too bright for households and was only used to light public places once a reliable electric generator had been developed by Gramme in Paris in 1871.
     
In Melbourne, the most notable floodlit event was a footy game at the MCG on 6th August, 1879 between Collingwood Artillery and East Melbourne. In that year, the incandescent lamp was invented separately by Swan and Edison, and gave a much less bright light of about 16 candle power, suitable for domestic use."
       
Trevor McAllister : Electric junk
Ockams Razor / ABC Radio National 4 July 2010

Engraving of a football match played under electric lights at the MCG, printed in the Illustrated Australian News, 1879
       
sandyhill writes at austadiums :

1) The drawing shows the first football match under electric lights between Collingwood Artillery (not to be confused with the later Collingwood FC) and East Melbourne, playing in 1879.

2) Its also the exact ground (known as Richmond Paddock) where the sport of Australian Football first started in 1858 - not inside the MCG, but next to it on its northern side - basically where the exterior of the new Northern Stand now is.

3) The original reversible Northern Stand is seen on the right hand side. As football was not allowed on the MCG until 1882, the stands ingenious reversible design allowed the seats to face the cricket ground in Summer and the football ground in Winter. However, by the time it burned down in 1883 to be replaced (refer to photo of the replacement stand on the first post above), football was played on the MCG itself, and no longer on Richmond Paddock.

4) Finally, if you can, note the packed crowd. A near capacity 12,000 attended this match - at a time when football crowds (any code) never exceeded 2,000 in the UK, or anywhere else.

Light Show
Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney
16 April - 5 July 2015



Theatre of the Actors of Regard  
 detail
 A Person Looks At A Work Of Art/
 someone looks at something...

 LOGOS/HA HA

                         
     
         

18 April 2015

The Charge of the Light Regard : from Logos to Lenin's Lamps and now the Light Show

     
Again Jesus spoke to them, saying, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.”
John 8:12  The Bible, English Standard Version

Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney
16 April - 5 July 2015
            

 Lenin the Lamp and the Light : the cover of 'We Build' (1929)
                 
"Communism is Soviet power plus the electrification of the whole country."
Vladimir Lenin (1920)
Our Foreign and Domestic Position and Party Tasks. Moscow
GOELRO (State Commission for Electrification of Russia)

*These images come from the excellent article 'Lenin's Lamps' by Eric Laursen.
                
Below : Arkady Shaikhet (photographer), Lenin’s Lamp, 1925
     

Theatre of the Actors of Regard 
 detail
 A Person Looks At A Work Of Art/
 someone looks at something... 

 LOGOS/HA HA

         
     
        

16 April 2015

The Charge of the Light Regard


$20 adult
$15 concession
$50 family (2 adults + up to 3 children)
$10 youth (13-17 years)
$75 general admin + membership
Children under 12 are FREE, but must have a CHILD ticket for entry

Theatre of the Actors of Regard 
 detail
 A Person Looks At A Work Of Art/
 someone looks at something... 

 LOGOS/HA HA

     
     
Following a sell-out season at the Hayward Gallery in London, the spectacular Light Show comes to Sydney this winter.
Museum of Contemporary Art : 16 April - 5 July 2015
Light Show features works from the 1960s to the present day by major international artists. Ranging from atmospheric installations to sculptures that you can move around and even through, Light Show invites you to experience the spatial and sensory effects of light in a myriad of forms.             

 FIAPCE 
 detail
 A Person Looks At A Work Of Art/
 someone looks at something... 

 LOGOS/HA HA


See works from 17 international artists including James Turrell, David Batchelor, Jim Campbell, Carlos Cruz-Diez, Bill Culbert, Dan Flavin, Ceal Floyer, Jenny Holzer, Ann Veronica Janssens, Brigitte Kowanz, Anthony McCall, François Morellet, Iván Navarro, Katie Paterson, Leo Villareal and Cerith Wyn Evans.
Light Show is organised by the Hayward Gallery, London in association with the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia. Curated by Cliff Lauson, Hayward Gallery, London.


 FIAPCE 
 detail
 A Person Looks At A Work Of Art/
 someone looks at something... 

 LOGOS/HA HA
       
     
         

15 April 2015

Culture Crash

       

"Everyone is now a writer and a critic, but payment a rarity. Cultural authority has been replaced by personal quirk; expertise by bloggers with logorrhoea."


- Louise Adler / The Age
Culture Crash review : 
Scott Timberg assesses why Australian arts are under pressure
 detail
 A Person Looks At A Work Of Art/
 someone looks at something...

 LOGOS/HA HA

              
        
         

14 April 2015

Captain Look : Transit of Regard Observed

          
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  A Person Looks At A Work Of Art/
  someone looks at something...

  LOGOS/HA HA
       
       
        

12 April 2015

doodle dum & doodle dee

      
presents

scribble scribble scribble scribble 
   
on
          

click image to enlarge 
the front cover of The Monthly 
presents
an image of Julie Bishop, 
with HAND SPACE projection
as 
Supreme Goddess of the Void, 
with projection-space for image
for
the consumption production of
Theatre of the Actors of Regard
presents
A VoidScape Production :
          
The ] The Beholder ( Beholder
         

 detail
 A Person Looks At A Work Of Art/
 someone looks at something...

 LOGOS/HA HA



      

11 April 2015

Vale Richie Benaud


LOGOS : The Speaking Into Being of the World
HA HA : disruptions to the Logos, Silence for instance
                 
We've referred before to Salvatore Rosa's c.1645 self-portrait, his hand resting on the inscription AUT TACE, AUT LOQUERE MELIORA SILENTIO (Do not speak unless your words are better than silence).
         
     
We recalled it again last night when the cricket commentator Catherine McGregor spoke on ABC Lateline in tribute to the great cricketer and commentator Richie Benaud.
             
EMMA ALBERICI: Now unlike some of the other former players who go on to become commentators, Richie Benaud was actually a trained journalist.

CATHERINE MCGREGOR: Indeed he was.

EMMA ALBERICI: How do you think that influenced the way he attacked that job of commentating?

CATHERINE MCGREGOR: Well, he was conscientious. I had the pleasure of watching him at work. Richie did his work. He was fastidious in keeping across the players. He adapted. It's been mentioned by some of the contemporary writers today: change never frightened Richie. He saw the game. He debuted in first-class cricket hot on the heels of Bradman's Invincibles and he's died today and had been active up until a season ago. He never - he never one of those people who reverted to nostalgia or bemoaned a mythical golden era that we'd lost. He was always very much a contemporary, he was across the techniques of the players, he knew the players. And Jim Maxwell said a beautiful thing in the package and it was: it was his trademark. Richie never said anything that wouldn't improve on silence. He was a great broadcaster, he was a natural broadcaster, he let the pictures tell a story and with great aplomb and subtlety just add value, rather than hyping and talking to fill space. He was a very, very gifted broadcaster, and when you look at the longevity of that career, it's quite extraordinary, frankly.

           
detail
A Person Looks At A Work Of Art/
someone looks at something... 

        
LOGOS/HA HA 
     
       
On 4 January 2014 400 Richie Benauds, each with their Channel 9 microphone, took up commentary residence at The Sydney Cricket Ground for Day 2 of Australia vs England, The Ashes Test.  
         
LOGOS/HA HA of the highest order! Vale Richie.
          
    Theatre of the Actors of Regard 
 detail
 A Person Looks At A Work Of Art/
 someone looks at something...

 LOGOS/HA HA
   
   
         

10 April 2015

PROPOSITION + APPLICATION =

         
let VOID = VOID


    
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 A Person Looks At A Work Of Art/
 someone looks at something...

 LOGOS/HA HA
       
     
         

09 April 2015

'_______________________________'



‘_____’
           


Opening Celebration Thursday 9 April, 5:30-7:30pm

Iakovos Ameridis, Boni Cairncross, Christian Capurro, Scott Donovan, Alex Gawronski, Biljana Jancic, Astrid Lorange, Sean Lowry, Dane Mitchell, Salvatore Panatteri, Patrick Pound, Ilmar Taimre.


A group of artists consider the nature of blankness as a signifier of creative potential (in the sense of capturing the dilemma of approaching a blank piece of paper, digital file, gallery space or canvas with the intention of creating something). As such, the exhibition will ask questions such as: “What is a blank space?”; “Can there be a blank space?”; “What are the power dynamics associated with framing or designating a blank space?”; and “What are the aesthetic potentials of blankness?”


Something else about nothing: blankness as medium
Catalogue essay by Sean Lowry
        
Margaret Lawrence Gallery
40 Dodds Street
 Southbank VIC 3006
9 April - 16 May 2015



FIAPCE 
 detail
 A Person Looks At A Work Of Art/
 someone looks at something...

 LOGOS/HA HA